Edo-Kyo (江戸京)

Edo-Kyo (江戸・京) is a sushi-sashimi restaurant tucked down at the bottom of some off-street stairs along San-Jo street in Kyoto.  To get to it begin at the several-storied CD & DVD store at the corner of Kawabata and San-jo. Walk down San-jo past The Pig & Whistle. Edo-Kyo just a couple dozen steps further, on the same side of San-Jo as the CD store and Pig & Whistle.  Look for the sign on your left, then go down the stairs, through the split curtains (“noren“) and through the door into the restaurant-proper.

Top of the stairs Edo-Kyo sign and entrance.

Top of the stairs Edo-Kyo sign and entrance.

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Down the stairs. . .

Down the stairs. . .

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Master sushi chef, Jun-san, welcomes all patrons. . .

Master sushi chef, Jun-san, welcomes all patrons. . .

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Featured in a chapter of my upcoming book:

Edo-Kyo combined Tokyo’s old name “Edo” with the first half of “Kyoto”, designating a wide-ranging cuisine of sashimi and sushi and lightly grilled seafood.  It’s a single, white room with one long bar to the left and a with a contemporary calligraphic work spanning the entire, long wall to the patron’s right as they enter, having come down a set of stairs and through a door from the street above.  Cool jazz plays low and all chefs, servers and patrons speak in equally low, reserved voices – because you want to, not because you have to.  It’s a Comfortable Place, friendly and not pretentious.  There’s no fresher sushi in town.  It’s expensive, though.  I always had the vinegared octopus salad.  We both enjoyed the various cuts of tuna sashimi.  The flame-grilled scallop, with sea salt and lemon, is worth a trip to the other side of the world. . . .

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And while, yes, the scene painted in the excerpt set out immediately above was one I shared with my former spouse, I’ve visited EdoKyo many times over the intervening years with Japanese friends, with the Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice at Texas Christian University, with the Executive Director of the Jackson County (Alabama) Economic Development Authority, the (now retired) President of Nippon Steel & Sumikin-Intercom, and various other friends and acquaintances.  EdoKyo’s simply a favorite spot and I’ll oh-so-lament the day I go and find out it’s no longer there.

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  1. Sounds like a place I would enjoy 🙂

      • letsjapan
      • January 12th, 2013

      I’m quite sure you would. Thanks for stopping by!

      r n

  2. A book! Good for you. I know several people I’ll be recommending it to.

    As for Edo-Kyo, I just have to ask: when you get to the bottom of those stairs and through the curtains, do you have to knock at the door and say, “Joe sent me”? 😉

      • letsjapan
      • January 15th, 2013

      Thanks, much, Shoreacres. Much of it (the book), you’ve read already, and much you haven’t. A few more chapters to finish up, then I enter the world of Editing/Re-writing Hell. I wanted to get it all done by mid-February, but fat chance. More like April.

      As for that when-you-get-to-the-door moment, no, just walk in and say, “Wah! Subarashii!” (Whoa! Nice!). Actually, my name can be dropped. Though I’ve rarely been a big spender there (a few times, but not often), Jun knows me an my name.

      Cheers.

      r n

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